Skiing Down Bullshit Mountain with Two Trumps and a Triple Meurtre Non Résolu

Posted: July 22, 2018 in Uncategorized

Let me tell you something you already know: Donald Trump lies about everything.

Now let me tell you something you might not know: his inaugural wife, Ivana Trump née Zelnícková was neither an alternate nor a full-fledged member of the Czechoslovakian ski team at the 1972 Sapporo Winter Olympics.

I speculate you may not know this because I did not know this and I consider myself well informed.
As a consumer of mass media in 1980s NYC it was impossible to avoid Trump-brand™ propaganda and many publications—including the vaunted New York Times—described Ivana Trump as a former Olympian.
I assumed someone, somewhere had fact-checked this easily-verifiable assertion. I was wrong.

Spy Magazine über alles

Backstory: I cannot remember how Ivana Trump became a topic of conversation and even if I could recall it would have no bearing on this blogpost.
Suffice it to say I was lunching with friends and Ivana was mentioned and I cited her Olympic credentials.
“No, no, no,” my friend interjected, “Ivana’s Olympic career has been completely debunked.”

Embarrassed at having been hoodwinked and curious if other Trump-related lies still simmered in my subconscious
I recently undertook an exhaustive investigation of all Ivana-era Trump coverage and happened upon a startling circumstance.

On their first date: Stolen Valor Olympian and Portrait of the Fascist as a Young Man

Throughout the years both Donald and Ivana Trump have maintained they first met at the 1976 Montréal Olympics but this is, as is par for the course, untrue;
although Czech-born Ivana was a Montréal resident in the mid-70s the couple’s first encounter actually occurred in Manhattan, at then-hotspot Maxwell’s Plum.
Now to the interesting bit: one of the people present at the table during the Trumps’ initial meeting—-Canadian model Donna Maureen Andrade—would be murdered a few months after the Trumps’ introduction,
her slaying still unsolved. Courtesy of the November 24th, 1993 Montréal Gazette:

[Caveat: since the crimes discussed herein occurred in Montréal the majority of newspaper articles are en Français and sometimes the translations provided by Google seem a little . . . nonsensical. I’m almost certainly missing some nuances, so please pardonnez-moi.]

The first body was found in the parlor, just inside the front door. On February 2nd, 1977 a relative’s noontime visit to Montréal’s Manoir Haddon Hall, 2150 Sherbrooke Street, set the stage for a homicide investigation;
29-year old Antonio Sorgente, discovered in the front room, hadn’t died alone—detectives found a second decedent, 31-year old fashion designer Robert Theodore Thompson, Teddy to intimates,
sprawled on the bedroom floor wreathed in a halo of blood.
On the bed reposed the final victim, mannequin célèbre Donna Andrade, age 29; all three had been shot once in the head.

The three and a half room apartment where the murders transpired was rented by Donna Andrade but the superintendent reported Teddy Thompson, her romantic partner, was ever-present.
Manoir Haddon Hall is a luxury building in an exclusive neighborhood—the adjective “stately” is a common descriptor—yet the Andrade-Thompson-Sorgente slayings aren’t the residence’s only macabre association.
A Satanic horror movie variously known as The Pyx, La Lannule and The Hooker Cult Murders had been filmed at the location, the building’s edifice visible in several exterior shots.

[The Montréal Gazette reports the film was in production during the 1977 triple slaying but according to IMDB The Pyx was released in 1973—apparently the New York Times isn’t the only media organization with a laissez-faire attitude toward fact-checking.]

The summer of 1977 was a lawless time in Montréal, the crime rate skyrocketing as the local police staged a slowdown amid a pension negotiation stalemate.
Predictably, the law enforcement dispute hampered the investigation into the Andrade-Thompson-Sorgente slayings;
the evening before the bodies’ discovery a woman in an adjacent apartment thought she heard gunfire at approximately 11:30pm; when she peered down the hallway nothing seemed amiss, however,
and afraid of wasting overburdened law enforcement resources she failed to notify authorities.

Although unnamed, the Andrade-Thompson-Sorgente murders are the West End triple slaying referenced


 
Improbably, the triple murder’s posh location and Donna Andrade’s high-profile career weren’t the most noteworthy aspects of the Manoir Haddon Hall slayings;
two of the victims, Donna and Teddy Thompson, had been involved in another homicide a mere two and a half years earlier.

5:20am, July 25th 1974; another luxury apartment, another frantic phone call to police.
In an eerie foreshadowing of future events Montréal investigators arrived at 1250 St. Mathieu Street and found Donna Andrade and Teddy Thompson at a homicide scene.
This time, however, only the third person present in the residence was slain—Diane Juteau, age 25, Teddy Thompson’s wife and mother of his three small children.
Diane had been shot through the left eye with .357 Magnum, the bullet travelling at a slight upward trajectory and lodging in her skull.

Manoir Haddon Hall, present day

Although both Donna Andrade and Teddy Thompson were taken into police custody Donna was released after a cursory investigation; Teddy, despite his avowal the shooting had been accidental, was charged with his wife’s homicide.
At trial Donna testified she’d been in the process of ending their two-year extramarital affair when Teddy began threatening suicide and brandishing a newly-purchased firearm;
she had summoned his wife Diane, she claimed, to try to talk some sense into him.
According to Donna she’d been in another room putting on a record to lighten the mood (♫ Suicide is Painless ♫) when the fatal shot rang out and she had thus failed to witness Diane’s death.

“I told him I loved him but I had to leave him because our relationship wasn’t working out and I was very unhappy. Teddy asked me not to leave him and said if I didn’t stay with him he would blow his brains out.” Trial testimony of Donna Andrade, Montréal Gazette, January 9th, 1975

Teddy Thompson, testifying in his own defense, alleged he’d been demonstrating the sincerity of his suicidal intentions by gesticulating with his .357—as one does—when he tripped and the revolver mysteriously fired.
The plausibility of his story is impossible to gage because the case was never adjudicated by the finder of fact;
Thompson cut a deal mid-trial, typically an indication the proceedings aren’t going in the defendant’s favor (in American courts, at least).

On January 20th, 1975 Teddy Thompson accepted a manslaughter plea and was sentenced to a whopping three years in prison; the precise length of Thompson’s sojourn behind bars is unclear
but he was fancy-free two years later when he went from shooter to shootee, his mid-flight stance at death indicating his suicidal impulses were a thing of the past.

  Marketing executive: “The cover art’s okay but do you think you could sex it up a little?


 
Several newspaper articles describe the Andrade-Thompson-Sorgente murders as a probable “settling of accounts,”
and I assumed the accounts being settled involved Thompson’s ludicrous sentence for the death of his wife—perhaps a friend or relative of Diane Juteau had opted to mete out a more commensurate punishment.
Not an advisable course of action, but understandable under the circumstances.

Further investigation into Antonio Sorgente’s past,
however, provided evidence the accounts being settled may have belonged to him:
at the age of 21 Sorgente was one of four men arrested for a series of violent 1968 armed robberies—the disposition of his case was never publicized, indicating he may have cut a deal in exchange for testimony.
Sorgente’s codefendants in the crime spree ultimately received as much as twelve years in prison
which (if paroled) would’ve put them back on the street in the same rough time frame as the Manoir Haddon Hall murder.

Of course, it’s also possible the Andrade-Thompson-Sorgente slayings involved narcotics; a small blurb in the Canadian true crime magazine ‘Allo Police describes the crime as an “affaire de drogue,”
although the identity of the victim or victims—Andrade, Thompson or Sorgente—with drug involvement is unspecified.
So many possible motives, yet so little evidence available for elimination purposes.

  Designer: “Say no more.”


 
Four decades later, mysteries in the case persist: was Diane’s homicide the precipitating event for the Manoir Haddon Hall murders or was one of the other scenarios the true impetus for the crime?
And why in God’s name did Donna Andrade resume her affair with Teddy Thompson after his release from prison?
Donna’s professed desire to be free of Teddy led directly to his wife’s death—their continued relationship seems like a postmortem slap in Diane Juteau’s face, essentially heaping insult on top of her (fatal) injury.

On a more germane note: why didn’t 1980s NYC media reveal Donna Andrade’s presence at the Donald-Ivana introduction, an inarguably colorful detail?
I’m aware of the publishing truism when truth and legend contradict it’s advisable to print the legend
but in this case the legend of Ivana’s Olympic feats seem less newsworthy than the first Trump marriage being only one degree away from an unsolved triple homicide.

[Irony alert: if a witness to Hillary and Bill Clinton’s introduction was mysteriously murdered there’d be an entire cottage industry built around blaming the crime on deep-state crisis actors and Hillary Clinton’s voracious vagina dentata.]

I need a word for the frustration I feel when I spend weeks hunting down a photo and then this; photus interruptus? Pixel blocked?

 
The moral of today’s post is multifaceted, but let’s begin with the valuable life-lesson imparted via the tragic fate of Diane Juteau: if your husband’s girlfriend summons you at 5am to tango with his suicidal impulses decline the invitation.
Solemnly state, “Sister, he’s your problem now,” and hang up the phone.
The unfortunate end of the glamorous Donna Andrade is also a teachable moment:
if your paramour does time for killing your predecessor end the relationship—regardless of your personal circumstances you deserve a romantic partner without blood on his or her hands.

The most important (dare I say big-league?) lesson provided by this post, however, comes courtesy of Donald Trump—possibly the only decent and useful commodity he will ever impart to humanity.
Always check your sources.
Who knows? The true story might be far more fascinating than stolen Olympic glory.

But I understand there are some allegations even the bravest fact-checkers won’t touch

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